Fruits, seeds and flowers before 19th May

Fruits, seeds and flowers before 19th May

Autumn here in Auckland, New Zealand can be such a lovely time.

It’s late in the season to sow seeds, but if you want to try for optimum growth of fruits, seeds and flowers this week, best to try on

Wednesday 15th – Saturday 18th May 2019.

Before the full moon on Sunday 19th May 2019.

Down-under, here in New Zealand, days are short so there is less sunlight to support good growth.

The ground is still warmish.

  • Peas. Maybe it’s time to plant peas again now – they like it cooler so will crop in the cooler season.  Plant the seeds 3x diameter of the seed to keep them down where the soil will be moister than near the surface where they could still dry out.
  • Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussel-sprouts, kale, etc – seedlings rather than seeds probably would be better now. So we get a crop before these slow-growing plants bolt to seed as weather warms up in spring.
  • Flowers – check requirements. Maybe we can still plant flowers which will over-winter – different types to spring planting. Sweet peas! Love them.

20171031_092328

This week the moon is growing towards full and the days listed are when many aspects line up to give optimum good germination for strong seedlings. Worth a try I think.

 

Choko: a ‘fruit’ we use as a vegetable is in season now – and the look-alike noxious pest Moth Plant is also fruiting now!

To know which you have, here’s a post I wrote to help show the differences – Chokos are delicious, especially when small! Enjoy.

Top row – Noxious:

Bottom row – delicious!

Here’s the post I wrote to help show the differences so you can enjoy chokos!

 

May you and your garden flourish
Heather

PS

For more ideas about what to sow and when in NZ, have a look at  http://gardenate.com

PPS

For more about planting by the  moon phases,

If you like experiments about when to plant for best results, a great one is to plant the same seeds in rows right beside each other [so all other conditions are identical], and label the rows with the date of planting. Then sow seeds from 1 packet at weekly intervals, each week in a new row.

This way you can see how the recommendations for best/worst seed sowing outcomes from moon-planting guides work for you. Maybe they do, and maybe they don’t.

I enjoy experimenting with such ideas – and if only I can rescue the rows from the snails and black-birds, I might even get some results to share!

Here’s a post I wrote about planting by the moon phases if you like more information and reflections on it.

Moon planting guides remind me to plant SOMETHING, plan a little, and help me have a continuous supply!

Plant leafy greens after 5th May

Plant leafy greens after 5th May

Leafy greens love cooler weather.

Endive, miners lettuce [not really a lettuce], gotu kola, parsley, rocket, chervil, coriander, lettuce, etc. There are so many varieties we can plant now.

[NB – not heat-lovers like basil though, and gotu kola needs a sheltered spot to start to root and will grow when weather warms up in late Spring]]

This is a good time to plant a new lot of lettuce and other greens to provide lovely leaves for many months now the weather is cooler as the days are shorter. And it’s too cold for the caterpillars hopefully by now.

Caterpillars in autumn seem to love leafy green lettuces here. Green looper caterpillars created havoc last year. They don’t seem to like the endive or other greens nearly as much as succulent, juicy lettuce. Keep a close eye on your tender crops and if the ends of leaves look like they are being removed, check under-sides of all leaves for a caterpillar [small or large!]

 

Soil temperature

If the soil is too cold, seeds take ages to start to grow. Then they rot or are eaten by beasties. Find a warm spot to sow seeds.

Try an experiment some time and go out at mid-afternoon and put your hand flat onto soil in full sun and notice how cold/hot it is. Now feel soil in a shaded place. Then choose where best to sow/plant for your crops.

Best times for planting seeds of greens?

After the new moon on Sunday 5th May 2019 is the best week to plant for lush leafy greens.

The best days are Monday 6th, then again on Thursday 9th and Friday 10th 2019. 

 

May you and your garden flourish
Heather

PS

For more ideas about what to sow and when in NZ, have a look at  http://gardenate.com

 

PPS

For more about planting by the  moon phases,

If you like experiments about when to plant for best results, a great one is to plant the same seeds in rows right beside each other [so all other conditions are identical], and label the rows with the date of planting. Then sow seeds from 1 packet at weekly intervals, each week in a new row.

This way you can see how the recommendations for best/worst seed sowing outcomes from moon-planting guides work for you. Maybe they do, and maybe they don’t.

I enjoy experimenting with such ideas – and if only I can rescue the rows from the snails and black-birds, I might even get some results to share!

Here’s a post I wrote about planting by the moon phases if you like more information and reflections on it.

Moon planting guides remind me to plant SOMETHING, plan a little, and help me have a continuous supply!

Take time out from sowing seeds until after the 5th May

Take time out from sowing seeds until after the 5th May

Take time out from sowing seeds from Saturday 27th April until after the dark of the moon on Sunday 5th May 2019. As the moon nears its smallest visible ‘dark of the moon’ phase, this time is associated with spindly, weak growth – wait a week or so.

Do other things instead.

Such as enjoy the stunning autumn colours of trees, flowers and seeds in the garden.

Autumn is such a lovely month for flowers and color. Trees changing from green to gold, red and brown. Then shedding leaves onto the ground.

Gingko 20170601

For some of us, this is a gift of mulch/compost for the garden, nourishing plants we grow.

For some people, it’s a problem, creating mess, blocked drains and slippery paths.

So, if you are an avid gardener, consider leaves as a resource falling from our trees to the ground. Especially from our beautiful street trees which provide shade in summer and light in winter. It would be great if the leaves were used rather than taken away as waste by the council street sweeper.

And if your neighbors see the leaves as a problem, maybe you can relieve them of their problem to create a wonderful benefit in your garden. This is a great time to

  • Have a big ‘clean-up’ time! Build a new compost bin – this is a time when lots of annual plants die and are ready to be composted – a great mix with the carbon from leaves fallen to the ground and some grass clippings or manure.
  • Renovate garden beds ready for their next plantings and give them a covering of leaves over some compost and other nutrients. Stops weeds growing and soil washing away in heavy rain as well as giving the worms and other soil life protection from the cold winter weather.
  • Make some lovely leaf mold for great potting mixes in spring from the fallen leaves.
  • A-n-d  save seeds from your best plants when the seeds are fully formed and brown/black or otherwise matured so they will keep well.

 

Happy autumn gardening everyone!

May you and your garden flourish
Heather

PS

For more ideas about what to sow and when in NZ, have a look at Tui Planting calendar or at http://gardenate.com    [although I disagree with some of the recommendations as Auckland really is more temperate than sub-tropical we have found]

PPS:   

For more about planting by the  moon phases,

If you like experiments about when to plant for best results, a great one is to plant the same seeds in rows right beside each other [so all other conditions are identical], and label the rows with the date of planting. Then sow seeds from 1 packet at weekly intervals, each week in a new row.

This way you can see how the recommendations for best/worst seed sowing outcomes from moon-planting guides work for you. Maybe they do, and maybe they don’t.

I enjoy experimenting with such ideas – and if only I can rescue the rows from the snails and black-birds, I might even get some results to share!

Here’s a post I wrote about planting by the moon phases if you like more information and reflections on it.

Moon planting guides remind me to plant SOMETHING, plan a little, and help me have a continuous supply!

 —

Sow below-ground crops after 19th April

Sow below-ground crops after 19th April

Recommended best days for sowing seeds to grow great root crops are

Saturday 20th and Sunday 21st April, then again from Wednesday 24th to Friday 26th April 2019.

Often planting charts talk generally of sowing these seeds during the week after the full moon – which will be on Friday 19th April 2019.

Here in south Auckland the ground is moist and still warmish. According to NIWA seasonal forecast April-June 2019, it’s supposed to be warmer than average, with maybe less rainfall and soil moisture[?]. I wonder if we may still get further growth before the coldest part of the year.

So we are putting in some carrots – I prefer Egmont Gold as it is less affected by carrot fly.

Also beetroot, daikons, radish, parsnip, etc.

Garlic

Garlic can be planted from now with good results. We’ll prepare some areas and start putting the crop in from now onward until the shortest day.

Some years we’ve had great success with this crop – to read how we grew great garlic, go here.

20161207_171407

We’ll choose the biggest bulbs, with the biggest cloves to replant first. The bigger the seed clove, the bigger the food store for the new seedling so it has the best start to grow big and strong.

Then we’ll save the large cloves from smaller bulbs to also plant. [And eat the smaller cloves]

May you and your garden flourish
Heather

 

PS

For more ideas about what to sow and when in NZ, have a look at Tui Planting calendar or at http://gardenate.com    [although I disagree with some of the recommendations as Auckland really is more temperate than sub-tropical we have found]

 

PPS

For more about planting by the  moon phases,

If you like experiments about when to plant for best results, a great one is to plant the same seeds in rows right beside each other [so all other conditions are identical], and label the rows with the date of planting. Then sow seeds from 1 packet at weekly intervals, each week in a new row.

This way you can see how the recommendations for best/worst seed sowing outcomes from moon-planting guides work for you. Maybe they do, and maybe they don’t.

I enjoy experimenting with such ideas – and if only I can rescue the rows from the snails and black-birds, I might even get some results to share!

Here’s a post I wrote about planting by the moon phases if you like more information and reflections on it.

Moon planting guides remind me to plant SOMETHING, plan a little, and help me have a continuous supply!

Sow seeds for fruits and flowers before 19th April

Sow seeds for fruits and flowers before 19th April

Autumn here in New Zealand can be such a lovely time.

It’s time we can sow seeds for optimum growth of fruits, flowers and seed production this week after Sunday 13th,

especially Thursday 18th April 2019.

Before the full moon on Friday 19th April 2019.

 

Down-under, here in New Zealand,

The ground is still warm and seeds can germinate quickly. If you haven’t already planted these and have them growing strongly, another sowing can be worth a try. NIWA forecast a late, warm autumn so it’s worth a try still

We can still sow seeds throughout the week of

  • beans – if you can keep them warm. A plastic tunnel was great last year for us to get a good crop into winter. I sow direct and put out snail bait or surround them with plastic cut-off bottles to protect from snails and slugs which love baby seedling legumes. ‘Prince’ dwarf variety is good to grow now.
  • Peas! Maybe it’s time to plant peas again now – they like it cooler so will crop when the cooler weather arrives.  Plant the seeds 3x diameter of the seed to keep them down where the soil will be moister than near the surface where they could still dry out.
  • Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussel-sprouts, kale, etc – seedlings rather than seeds probably would be better now.
  • Flowers – check requirements. Now we can plant flowers which will over-winter – different types to spring planting. Sweet peas! Love them.

20171031_092328

 

This week the moon is growing towards full and the days listed are when many aspects line up to give optimum good germination for strong seedlings. Worth a try I think.

 

May you and your garden flourish
Heather

PS

For more ideas about what to sow and when in NZ, have a look at  http://gardenate.com

 

PPS

For more about planting by the  moon phases,

If you like experiments about when to plant for best results, a great one is to plant the same seeds in rows right beside each other [so all other conditions are identical], and label the rows with the date of planting. Then sow seeds from 1 packet at weekly intervals, each week in a new row.

This way you can see how the recommendations for best/worst seed sowing outcomes from moon-planting guides work for you. Maybe they do, and maybe they don’t.

I enjoy experimenting with such ideas – and if only I can rescue the rows from the snails and black-birds, I might even get some results to share!

Here’s a post I wrote about planting by the moon phases if you like more information and reflections on it.

Moon planting guides remind me to plant SOMETHING, plan a little, and help me have a continuous supply!

 

 

 

 

Plant leafy greens after 5th April

Plant leafy greens after 5th April

Lettuces love cooler weather.

And other leafy greens – endive, miners lettuce [not really a lettuce], gotu kola, parsley, rocket, chervil, coriander, etc.

There are so many ways to have the benefit of raw, leafy greens, even in winter.

This is a good time to plant a new lot of lettuce and other greens to provide lovely leaves for many months now the weather is cooler as the days are shorter. And it’s too cold for the caterpillars soon.

Caterpillars in autumn seem to love leafy green lettuces here. Green looper caterpillars created havoc last year. This year I have planted them under an insect mesh net. Let’s see if that is better!

They don’t seem to like the endive or other greens nearly as much as succulent, juicy lettuce.

 

Moisture

It’s such a balancing act – too much moisture [either from over-head rain or watering] makes for constantly wet leaves which touch each other, hold moisture and become slimy or mush – not nice!

Keep them just moist so they can germinate and grow strong roots. Sometimes a tunnel-house or cover can grow  greens well when there is too much rain about. Isn’t Auckland amazing with the amount of rain and warmth we get.

 

Soil temperature

Too cold  and seeds take ages to start to grow.

Try an experiment some time and go out at mid-afternoon and put your hand flat onto soil in full sun and notice how cold/hot it is. Now feel soil in a shaded place. Then choose where best to sow/plant for your crops.

Best times for planting seeds of greens?

After the new moon on Friday 5th April 2019 is the best week to plant for lush leafy greens.

The best days are Sunday 7th – Monday 8th, and again on Thursday arvo 11th – Friday 12 April 2019. 

 

May you and your garden flourish
Heather

PS

For more ideas about what to sow and when in NZ, have a look at  http://gardenate.com

 

PPS

For more about planting by the  moon phases,

If you like experiments about when to plant for best results, a great one is to plant the same seeds in rows right beside each other [so all other conditions are identical], and label the rows with the date of planting. Then sow seeds from 1 packet at weekly intervals, each week in a new row.

This way you can see how the recommendations for best/worst seed sowing outcomes from moon-planting guides work for you. Maybe they do, and maybe they don’t.

I enjoy experimenting with such ideas – and if only I can rescue the rows from the snails and black-birds, I might even get some results to share!

Here’s a post I wrote about planting by the moon phases if you like more information and reflections on it.

Moon planting guides remind me to plant SOMETHING, plan a little, and help me have a continuous supply!

Of beans in winter

Of beans in winter

If you want to try extending the season for beans into colder months, here’s an experiment we ran to do so.

I planted beans mid autumn as an experiment – lets see if we can extend our bean season!

I’d heard from Stella that ‘Prince’ dwarf beans were OK to eat and grew better than others in cooler conditions – early in the season and late at the end of the normal bean season.

We gave the bed some compost, rock fertilizer and ‘Fodda’ with wonderful mix of nutrients. Just a little as beans will produce the part we like to eat better with little nitrogen [or they make lots of leaves and few fruits we eat].

They grew – and grew well.

20170529_150600

Then the weather got cooler. Cold winds were forecast so out came a plastic tunnel house to protect them.

Beans growing in winter under a plastic tunnel 20170529
Beans growing in winter under a plastic tunnel 20170529

They kept growing then flowered – and then fruited – and kept fruiting for weeks!

We were very impressed [well, those who like beans were. Those who aren’t beans fans were not very impressed at all].

Eventually they slowed down in bean production. The weather turned even colder and a real winter storm was forecast mid July in Auckland, so I finally cut the stems off at the base [leaving the roots to decompose and add nitrogen and other nutrients to the soil].

When it arrived, mid July in Auckland, with cold, rain, southerly winds straight off the antarctic ice, we were eating the productive bean harvest from yesterday – aren’t plastic tunnels amazing!

Here’s the last of the smaller beans for us to eat [shown in the colander].

20170712_112851

 

Beans with big seeds were left on the plants. I put them in a bucket to have time to send the nutrients from the plant into the seeds as they ripened and made hard seed coats. These will be our seeds to plant next season.

 

Overall, we were thrilled to have extended the season way beyond our normal one so will consider doing this again in future.

Maybe you might like to extend seasons of your favorite crops with plastic houses or tunnels or cloches too. It’s well worth a try.

May you and your garden flourish
Heather