It’s time to sow seeds of leafy greens after Monday 24th Feb 2020

It’s time to sow seeds of leafy greens after Monday 24th Feb 2020

As we move from Summer into Autumn, it’s time to sow seeds for luscious, tender leafy greens – and best days are:

  • Tuesday 25th February 
  • and again Saturday 29th February [Happy Leap Year!] and Sunday 1st March 2020 [here in New Zealand]

After the heat of summer, the move into March signals to plants that days are getting shorter, weather has less heat overall and its:

Time to grow lovely tender greens again – much more easily than through summer.

Let’s hope for good germination!  I will sow seeds of

  • Lettuce – I left many varieties to seed so hopefully some will do well no matter what the weather does this year – hot/dry/cold/wet.
  • Silver-beet [including rainbow chard/ bright light beets – the ones with vibrant colored stems – so stunning to see in a garden] we left to seed in the garden and they are sprouting up now
  • Rocket [Arugula] is tasty rather than bitter at this time. We plant 2 types – the large leaf annual and the stronger, smaller-leaf perennial rocket [some are even coming up self-sown now – wonderful]
  • Mustard greens, or the giant red mustard is pretty nice early in the season before the heat of summer adds too much pepper bite. [also appearing on their own now]
  • Asian greens [assorted] – here they grow well in the cooler months – they grow so fast! We have Mizuna self-seeding. We grow 2 types – an ordinary green one as well as the deep red one – stunning in the garden [for a short time]
  • Endive  We grow 2 types – a broader leaf variety and a lovely fine, frilly variety. They are lovely and tender in cooler months so we enjoy them now. Both grow more slowly than lettuce. [and are appearing themselves now – we left a lot to seed last year]
  • cilantro [leaf coriander] -maybe it will grow lovely leaves rather than bolting to seed now!

This is a great time to have leafy greens grow well – they love cooler, wetter times.

Enjoy delightful salads with a range of leaf types in these cooler months.

May the weather support growing great plants! 
Cheers
Heather

PS:

For more about planting by the  moon phases,

If you like experiments about when to plant for best results, a great one is to plant the same seeds in rows right beside each other [so all other conditions are identical], and label the rows with the date of planting. Then sow seeds from 1 packet at weekly intervals, each week in a new row.

This way you can see how the recommendations for best/worst seed sowing outcomes from moon-planting guides work for you. Maybe they do, and maybe they don’t.

I enjoy experimenting with such ideas – and if only I can rescue the rows from the snails and black-birds, I might even get some results to share!

Here’s a post I wrote about planting by the moon phases if you like more information and reflections on it.

Moon planting guides remind me to plant SOMETHING, plan a little, and help me have a continuous supply!

Take a rest from sowing seeds until after 24th Feb 2020

Take a rest from sowing seeds until after 24th Feb 2020

Take time out from sowing seeds from Sunday 16th February 2020 until after the dark of the moon on Monday 24th February 2020. As the moon nears its smallest visible ‘dark of the moon’ phase, this time is associated with spindly, weak growth – wait a week or so.

Maybe enjoy harvesting, feasting and storing from what was sown before?  What a wonderful season it is here in Auckland.

It’s also a time to clear out residue of crops which have finished. Amazing how much mass food plants make which can add wonders to compost heaps/bins. It’s really nice to find fresh beds available again after growing steadily throughout spring/summer.

 

It’s also a time we can put aside seeds for next year:

 

It’s not a time to sow/plant just yet, rather prepare beds well, ready for better sowing times, especially as autumn is on the way!

 

I hope you too can enjoy produce from plants you put in before – fresh as well as stored in your favorite ways.

A garden can be a great place to spend a few moments to re-connect with ourselves. Your well-being is supported by your garden if you can take a few moments and be revitalized and ready for the rest of your day. Take a few minutes to sit and enjoy the garden – really sit and savor it.

 

Best wishes for you and your garden!
Heather

 

PS:

For more about planting by the  moon phases,

If you like experiments about when to plant for best results, a great one is to plant the same seeds in rows right beside each other [so all other conditions are identical], and label the rows with the date of planting. Then sow seeds from 1 packet at weekly intervals, each week in a new row.

This way you can see how the recommendations for best/worst seed sowing outcomes from moon-planting guides work for you. Maybe they do, and maybe they don’t.

I enjoy experimenting with such ideas – and if only I can rescue the rows from the snails and black-birds, I might even get some results to share!

Here’s a post I wrote about planting by the moon phases if you like more information and reflections on it.

Moon planting guides remind me to plant SOMETHING, plan a little, and help me have a continuous supply!

 

Sow below-ground crops after 9th Feb

Sow below-ground crops after 9th Feb

If you can keep soil moist, these are good times to sow root crops:

  • Wednesday 12th February through to Saturday 15th February 2020.

after the full moon on Sunday 9th February 2020. [Here in New Zealand]

Here in Auckland, it has been warm and dry, dry, dry. The ground is warm and germination can be fast as long as it stays moist. Can you keep soil moist consistently? We don’t try at this time of year, we wait until autumn.

Hot soil can also inhibit germination so cool, moist is the preference for these seeds.

If we have more frequent hot days, that can be enough to send tiny seedlings to bypass forming a root and make seeds instead.

 

 

May you and your garden flourish
Heather

PS

For more ideas about what to sow and when in NZ, have a look at  http://gardenate.com

 

PPS

For more about planting by the  moon phases,

If you like experiments about when to plant for best results, a great one is to plant the same seeds in rows right beside each other [so all other conditions are identical], and label the rows with the date of planting. Then sow seeds from 1 packet at weekly intervals, each week in a new row.

This way you can see how the recommendations for best/worst seed sowing outcomes from moon-planting guides work for you. Maybe they do, and maybe they don’t.

I enjoy experimenting with such ideas – and if only I can rescue the rows from the snails and black-birds, I might even get some results to share!

Here’s a post I wrote about planting by the moon phases if you like more information and reflections on it.

Moon planting guides remind me to plant SOMETHING, plan a little, and help me have a continuous supply!

 

 

Time to sow seeds for fruits and flowers before 9th Feb 2020

Time to sow seeds for fruits and flowers before 9th Feb 2020

Down-under this week we can sow seeds for optimum growth of fruits, flowers and seeds,

  • especially Monday 3rd February
  • and again Thursday 6th through to morning of Saturday 8th February 2020  [here in New Zealand].

Before the full moon on Sunday 9th February 2020

It’s time to look at planting for the autumn/winter harvest [brassicas like broccoli, cauli, as it’s the flowering heads we eat. [Cabbage, kale etc leaves are the primary parts so maybe they belong with leafy greens].

Maybe there’s still time to plant more of the following?

  • legumes – such as beans – a new batch of dwarf beans is easiest now. Beans 20170111
  • Flowers – check requirements – there are so many options – find which ones you like which are good to sow now.

 

This week the moon is growing towards full and the days listed are when many aspects line up to give optimum good germination for strong seedlings if the outside climate is provided for their needs.

May the weather support growing great plants! 
Cheers
Heather

PS:

For more about planting by the  moon phases,

If you like experiments about when to plant for best results, a great one is to plant the same seeds in rows right beside each other [so all other conditions are identical], and label the rows with the date of planting. Then sow seeds from 1 packet at weekly intervals, each week in a new row.

This way you can see how the recommendations for best/worst seed sowing outcomes from moon-planting guides work for you. Maybe they do, and maybe they don’t.

I enjoy experimenting with such ideas – and if only I can rescue the rows from the snails and black-birds, I might even get some results to share!

Here’s a post I wrote about planting by the moon phases if you like more information and reflections on it.

Moon planting guides remind me to plant SOMETHING, plan a little, and help me have a continuous supply!

 

Sow seeds of leafy greens next week after 25th Jan 2020

Sow seeds of leafy greens next week after 25th Jan 2020

 

 

 

Sow seeds for leafy greens next week after the dark of the moon on Saturday 25th February 2020.

Best days:

  • Monday 27th January through to Wednesday 29th January,
  • then again Saturday 1st February 2020 [here in New Zealand].

This is a challenging time to grow leafy greens – through summer heat and humidity. Partial shade and constant water supply help them grow leaves rather than bolt to seed.

If you do plant, heat-lovers are good. Cool-loving lettuce, spinach, coriander [cilantro] take more care and attention at this time – can you give it to them now?

Leafy greens are best in semi-shade now as they bolt to seed in strong sun and dry soil.

They need constant moisture to stay tender [Auckland is really helping there with all the rain we’ve had!].  I keep a watch on soil moisture around them [I poke a finger into the soil and feel if its moist or not].

It’s good to sow new batches often so there are more growing leaves when previous crops are making flowers and seeds instead.

If you do sow seeds, choose from

  • Lettuce – I’ve spread around seed-heads from a number of summer varieties so hopefully some will do well no matter what the weather does now – hot/dry/wet. In shade as well as some sunnier beds.
  • Silver-beet [including rainbow chard/ bright light beets – the ones with vibrant colored stems – so stunning to see in a garden] These are self-seeding around the garden at present. Even perpetual beet [which is coarser to us but withstands rust and mold better than traditional forms so we grow some of each.
  • Rocket [Arugula] – the perennial version which is stronger tasting, and has finely divided leaves. It seems to survive the heat better, in fact, it has prospered this year.
  • Asian greens – maybe mizuna. Haven’t grown so well this summer, so maybe more success soon.
  • New Zealand Spinach ours is self-seeding so I’ll look see if there are little, new ones growing. It’s OK cooked [needs 2 changes of boiling water to draw out and minimize the oxalic acid content – in the same way that adult forms of true spinach and silver-beet also need]

Still time to plant hot-climate ‘greens’ including:

  • Basil
  • Magenta Spreen [Chenopodium giganteum] – see Wikipedia for more info
    Amaranth [we like Mekong Red =  Amaranthus tricolor] – see Wikipedia
    for more info 
    Orach [Atriplex hortensis] – see Wikipedia
    for more info
    All grow more strongly in warmer weather than do lettuce or silver-beet. Most also grow far taller than lettuce. Do some research. Have a go with something different too.

 

 

 

Cilantro I find too quick to bolt to seed at this time.

 

Summer is a challenging time to have traditional leafy greens grow well – they need some care.

 

Best wishes and enjoy the warm weather and your garden!
Heather

 

PS:

For more about planting by the  moon phases,

If you like experiments about when to plant for best results, a great one is to plant the same seeds in rows right beside each other [so all other conditions are identical], and label the rows with the date of planting. Then sow seeds from 1 packet at weekly intervals, each week in a new row.

This way you can see how the recommendations for best/worst seed sowing outcomes from moon-planting guides work for you. Maybe they do, and maybe they don’t.

I enjoy experimenting with such ideas – and if only I can rescue the rows from the snails and black-birds, I might even get some results to share!

Here’s a post I wrote about planting by the moon phases if you like more information and reflections on it.

Moon planting guides remind me to plant SOMETHING, plan a little, and help me have a continuous supply!

Take a rest from sowing seeds until after Saturday 25th Jan – enjoy harvests instead!

Take a rest from sowing seeds until after Saturday 25th Jan – enjoy harvests instead!

Take time out from sowing seeds from Saturday 18th January until after the dark of the moon on Saturday 25th January 2020. As the moon nears its smallest visible ‘dark of the moon’ phase, this time is associated with spindly, weak growth – wait a week or so.

Maybe enjoy feasting from what was sown before? Strawberries, other berries, plums, nectarines, peaches, apricots! What a wonderful season it is here in Auckland.

The ground is drying out here in Auckland and there is no significant rain forecast for the next weeks. Keep it simple. Keep an eye on soil moisture – automatic waterers are wonderful.

And spend time enjoying produce from plants you put in before. Harvest time is lots of fun. There is something special about harvesting and eating something to eat from seeds you planted so long ago. Love it.

 

 

 

Best wishes and I hope you can enjoy your garden with whatever it offers now!

May you and your garden flourish
Heather

PS

For more ideas about what to sow and when in NZ, have a look at  http://gardenate.com

 

PPS

For more about planting by the  moon phases,

If you like experiments about when to plant for best results, a great one is to plant the same seeds in rows right beside each other [so all other conditions are identical], and label the rows with the date of planting. Then sow seeds from 1 packet at weekly intervals, each week in a new row.

This way you can see how the recommendations for best/worst seed sowing outcomes from moon-planting guides work for you. Maybe they do, and maybe they don’t.

I enjoy experimenting with such ideas – and if only I can rescue the rows from the snails and black-birds, I might even get some results to share!

Here’s a post I wrote about planting by the moon phases if you like more information and reflections on it.

Moon planting guides remind me to plant SOMETHING, plan a little, and help me have a continuous supply!

Grow below-ground crops after 11th Jan 2020

Grow below-ground crops after 11th Jan 2020

Here in Auckland, New Zealand, the outside ground is warm and germination will be fast. Keeping ground moist for tiny seedlings is often the issue at this time of year, although it was a very rainy Spring, Summer arrived and has been dry. I wonder what will happen from now onward?

We wait until autumn to sow seed rather than sort out automatic irrigation at this time of year [or hand-hose frequently each day!]

Also, frequent hot days can be enough to send tiny seedlings to bypass forming a root and make seeds instead.

If you can keep soil moist, these are good times to sow root crops:

  •  Thursday 16th and Friday 17th January 2020.

after the full moon on Saturday 11th January 2020. [Here in New Zealand]

Some root crops can be transplanted, for example we’ve had success doing so with beetroot. Many others bolt straight to seed without forming nice big roots.

With carrots, we have success when sown directly into the open ground of warm soil with constant moisture. Transplants – not so much.

We focus more on caring for crops already growing now.

Best wishes for you and your garden 
Cheers
Heather

PS

For more ideas about what to sow and when in NZ, have a look at  http://gardenate.com

 

PPS

For more about planting by the  moon phases,

If you like experiments about when to plant for best results, a great one is to plant the same seeds in rows right beside each other [so all other conditions are identical], and label the rows with the date of planting. Then sow seeds from 1 packet at weekly intervals, each week in a new row.

This way you can see how the recommendations for best/worst seed sowing outcomes from moon-planting guides work for you. Maybe they do, and maybe they don’t.

I enjoy experimenting with such ideas – and if only I can rescue the rows from the snails and black-birds, I might even get some results to share!

Here’s a post I wrote about planting by the moon phases if you like more information and reflections on it.

Moon planting guides remind me to plant SOMETHING, plan a little, and help me have a continuous supply!